Bingo Airsoftworks Hopup, Buckings and Barrel Testing and Troubleshooting

Bingo Airsoftworks Hopup, Buckings and Barrel Testing and Troubleshooting


(presenting music) – [Voiceover] Okay, I’m
going to demonstrate a few diagnostic things
you can do with your hopup and bucking, and some
general remedies for problems that you may find. The first test you want
to do when you set up a hopup barrel and
bucking is do what I call the BB drop test. Now take your hopup and
barrel and take a BB and just drop it into the BB feed tube. The BB should, you can see that there, drop all the way into the hopup and not get hang up in the tube. If it gets hang up in the tube, it’s getting caught on the bucking lips and that will cause bucking lip jams. Take your hopup, drop the BB through and it should fall right into the hopup instead of getting stuck in the tube. Here’s an example of where
this is getting stuck. This is a different type of hopup and it has the same kind of problem. You can actually see the bucking intruding into the BB feed tube area but if I drop the BB, you
can see it stops right there. It does not go into the hopup and it actually needs
to be pressed through with a bit of force to
get it into the hopup. If this is the case,
what’s going to happen is when the BBs feed especially
at the high rate of fire, it’s going to catch on the
bucking lip right there and that’s going to fold in and get caught underneath the BB and that makes a jam that you can only undo
with an unjamming rod. That’s not a good thing to have. Now, how do you solve that problem? There are two ways to solve it. You could take the bucking
and you can cut down the lips. You can send them down and I’ll show you how
I recommend you do that but you can send down the
lips so they don’t intrude into the hopup area as much. The second thing you can
do is get a Dremel tool. I’m just going to point to it here but get a Dremel tool and
actually make the BB feed tube oval shaped at the top. You take a bit and run it
carefully across the top. You can actually look
at it from this angle with your bit running inside of here and make it oval shaped so
when you drop the BB in, it will actually go around the bucking and then into the hopup. That could help prevent some
of the bucking lip fold jams by making that oval shaped. This is a bit I like to
use when I want to profile the BB feed tube on a hopup. This bit does a nice job. You just have to be very
careful and do it very slowly and don’t over Dremel your hopup. You want to make sure it’s just enough to allow the BB to get
there on the bucking lips and not any more as you may
cause some other problems by just profiling it too far. The second test you’ll want to
do is the push through test. Once you’ve got the BBs
falling through your hopup, you want to make sure that the BB actually goes through the bucking cleanly and with very little resistance. There’s a BB inside this hopup and you just want to take
a tool and just push it. It should very easily go
right through the bucking. This is obviously with
the hopup turned off. You want everything
turned off or even removed but the BB should just feed
nice and easily through there with very, very little resistance
or no resistance at all. You’ll see that there are two problems. Sometimes it’s the bucking
that causes the issue where the push through test will fail or the hopup design itself. Here’s a Madbull ultimate hopup and I’m going to demonstrate
the BB drop test. It has this little O-ring
that’s at the top here which can actually interfere
with the fitting of the BB. That’s meant to keep BBs from falling out when you exchange mags but I recommend you take that O-ring out just so you get the cleanest
fit of BBs up the BB feed tube but nonetheless I’ll push it pass that. This hopup actually is very narrow and you can see it’s binding
a little bit in there. It fails the hopup drop test it doesn’t fall all the way through though it’s very, very little resistance. I think it’s just gummed up
inside here a little bit. Once the BB is inside the hopup and I try to push through test, you can tell that’s a lot harder to test or to push the BB through. I’ll put it back in here again
and show you just by pushing. It takes quite a bit of force and that’s because the
hopup design right here where the shoulders of the bucking meet, the opening for the BB
feed tube is too narrow and it squeezes the bucking lips down and it makes it very difficult
for the BB to push through. The bucking that’s in here
is a purple prommy bucking. I have an example of that
in one of these ProWin’s and here’s a purple prommy bucking and I’ll show that that
isn’t a bucking issue because I can put this
bucking on this barrel, put it into a ProWin and feed a BB through and you’ll see that it
pushes through very easily with very little resistance. There you go, not even any resistance. It just fed right through. Another thing that could cause the problem is the bucking itself. You can see that the BB’s feed
through fine on the ProWin but here’s a Prometheus
Delta Strike barrel that comes with a blue,
their blue clean bucking and I’ll put this in this ProWin and we’ll try the drop test. Fell right through so no problem there. Let’s try the push through test. There’s actually a lot of force against it and that’s just due to the
design of the bucking itself. It’s a little too thick
and the lips are too narrow and the material is too sticky. It really takes a lot of force. In fact in some hopups especially
if you put this bucking in this hopup, the combination it makes it nearly impossible to push the BB through. You want to make sure that the
BB goes through very easily or you’re going to risk running into all sorts of feeding jams. The way this is fixed,
there’s two ways to fix it. One, just never use this
purple or blue prommy bucking, it’s terrible. I had a whole bunch, I
just discarded them all, don’t use this. If you need to fix the hopup, you can actually drill out this area. Put a drill bit through
here that’s slightly larger and make this area a little bit larger so it doesn’t bind on the bucking lips. If the bucking is causing
a problem again like this, just don’t use this
bucking, it’s terrible. Okay, so that was the drop
test and the push through test. Let me show you a couple other
things that cause problems in some of these hopups
especially with a ProWin and the Maple Leaf which
is a popular combination. In fact that’s the
combination I like to use but there are some things
that are sometimes out of spec that can cause some issues. First of all, the Maple Leaf
has very long bucking lips which sometimes or in some ProWin hopups will actually cause a
failure on the drop test. For some reason it’s working
fine on both of these ProWins but I’ve had it filled before so I’ve had to Dremel
out the ProWin to allow, make it more oval shaped
so the BB can go around it. This Maple Leaf has what I
call very thick shoulders. That’s this area right
here, right behind the lips. When I put this Madbull barrel, this is a stock Madbull 603 barrel, I put this bucking on here. Just make sure I get this aligned properly and I’ll put it into the ProWin. You might be able to see
this, it’s very slight but the C-clip slot is not flushed against this cutaway here. You have to push really
hard to make that fit and it really shouldn’t be that way. It should align right at the edge. I can demonstrate this with a
different barrel and bucking. I’ll take this purple for
example, put this in here and you can see that
that goes straight flush to the edge so the C-clip will
cleanly go onto this hopup. With this Madbull combination and with the Maple Leaf, it
doesn’t go all the way in. It doesn’t go all the way in because the shoulders on the
Maple Leaf are too thick. Well, there’s really
two ways to solve that. One, use a different bucking but I actually like the
Maple Leaf quite a bit. For this what I end up doing
is I’ll take the Madbull barrel and I’ll narrow the bridge. This is what I call the
bridge, this part right here. I will cut that down and you can see, here’s an example of a stock Madbull and one that I’ve laid
down just a little bit to make this bridge just
a tiny bit more narrow. That would be about
half a millimeter or so is all that’s needed. Now when I put the Maple
Leaf bucking on here and I put this into the ProWin, you can see that the C-clip slot aligns right with the edge of the ProWin and the clip will go on cleanly. I’ll show some footage of
how I do this on the laid. I basically laid this down
and then re-profile it so there’s no sharp edges on it but just make that really narrow. There’s actually quite a few
differences in bridge sizes. You can actually see that between these two barrels and
I have another barrel here, this Bravo barrel which
has a really thick bridge. Now, it all depends on
where they cut their slots for the C-clip but those are
very difficult to recut cleanly so it’s easier just to narrow
down the bridge section if you need to adjust the
positioning of the C-clip slot. I’ll come back to this
Bravo barrel in a second and some other issues here. That’s one thing you want to do when you assemble these things, you can see that I can take,
here’s a stock Madbull. I put this prommy purple bucking on here which doesn’t have a stick off shoulders and I’ll slide this in. You can see that without any modification, this goes right up to the edge, so that should work just fine. It’s a combination of the Maple Leaf and the Madbull barrel or any barrel that has a thicker window there. One way to adjust that
again is to cut down the length of the barrel. Okay, back to this Bravo barrel here, I wanted to show some
differences of barrel quality. Again, I prefer the Madbull 603, they’re inexpensive and
they perform very well. If you have problems with it,
you can just get another one. They’re not a $100 barrel,
they’re $30 so it’s much better. You can see the size of
the window difference between these two. One, this Bravo barrel
has this slanted cut which I prefer not to use. You’ll find that on some barrels. I don’t like the slanted cut at all. I like the nice, large square window. It fits the Maple Leaf very nicely and/or hops and other types
of hops that you can do but you can see that
this is so much larger than this tiny one on this Bravo barrel. I would avoid any barrel
that has a slanted cut. Just make know to that
when you take a look at these barrel windows,
there is a difference and the depth of the
window makes a difference on how wide this window space is. If it’s not cut very deep,
this will be very narrow and will only allow very narrow
knobs to fit through that. You actually want a
very deep window as well which allows the bucking
to go all the way down. Another thing you want to look for when you’re dealing with the hopups and particularly with the fusion engine, I’ll demonstrate this here. When the hopup and the engine
are installed in a gun, you want to make sure that the hopup is completely flush against
the face of the fusion engine or against the gearbox for that matter. There shouldn’t be any
space between here and here. It should be totally flush. If there’s any space in between that. One, it’s going to make your
nozzle not make a clean seal and two, it will misalign the BB feed tube with your magazine. That needs to be flushed up against there and traditionally this
is done by using springs on the hopup into the upper receiver that pushes it toward the
gear box or the engine. More recently I like to use these O-rings, these are 011 or 011 sized O-rings that you put right on the inner barrel and in front of a hopup and
you can put as many as you need to make sure that when you
put it inside of a receiver like I show here, that
the spacing is just right. When you assemble the
lower, you want to make sure that this pushes right
up against the engine and that this doesn’t
move, forward or backward. If it moves, add another
O-ring and then try it again until you have it to right where
you squeeze it all together or assemble it. It’s perfectly locked in place, doesn’t move forward or backward and it’s completely flush
against the front cylinder. One of the things you
want to be careful of is not all hopups fit cleanly
into the front cylinder like this does. You can see the ProWin fits
just nicely inside there. The Madbull ultimate
actually fits nicely in there but here’s a G&G stock hopup and you can see that
it doesn’t fit cleanly. In fact you can fit it if you
really push hard against it and you can see that that
actually is jammed right in there. Commonly if you use a G&G stock hopup particularly with a fusion engine, you’ll find that, you’ll
see them assembled like this and they’re not flush and you’re going to get
a very poor air seal in consistent shooting
and this won’t line up with your magazines very well. The way to solve that is
to actually sand this down until it fits cleanly inside there and I tend to do that on a
laid that makes it a lot easier but you can hand sand that down. The alternative to do is actually drill this a little bit larger there but that’s a little bit more destructive and probably not necessary. Just modify the hopup just a little bit so it slides cleanly. When you assemble the gun,
it’s always completely seated against the face of the hopup. Excuse me, against the face of the engine. All right, another test you’ll want to do is the air seal test and to check and see that
there’s a solid air seal between your barrel and your fusion engine is you’ll want to blow
air down the inner barrel when the gun is assembled. I’m doing this outside of the gun so you can see all the parts but when this hopup is
pressed up against the face of the fusion engine, what I like to do and I’m showing this with
a shorter barrel here, is I take a piece of a spare macro line and I’ll insert this into the barrel and then you blow into it. You can tell that there’s
a very solid air seal if you have a lot of resistance when you blow into the barrel. If you hear something
that sounds like this (air hiss) where air flows cleanly through then you have a poor air seal and you’re going to get
very inconsistent shots. It probably won’t make a 100% seal, it’s very rare to have
a 100% seal actually. Honestly because some air leaks right out of that little alignment groove there but as long as there
significant resistance, you’ll get a really decent seal and your consistency will be much better. Using just a spare piece of
macro line in the barrel, when this is assembled inside the gun so you can actually test this. You can actually make sure
that there’s a solid air seal and you can do this with a fusion engine because the nozzles always fully forward and it’s a close system
so there’s no leakage at all with the air. This also is another nifty little trick if you find that your BBs are shooting to the left or to the right consistently. That generally means
that either your bucking is misaligned or your
barrels turned just slightly in your hopup. Well you can actually
adjust that sometimes with again a piece of macro line when it’s inside your gun. Insert the macro line, you can tell that’s a
pretty snug fit there and you can actually just
turn it just a little bit and you can rotate your
barrel while it’s in the gun and then you can test fire it to get it shooting
straight instead of left or hooking left to the right. A piece of macro line
is very helpful for that so you don’t have to
keep taking it all apart. Just tweak it from the outside and adjust the turn of your barrel. You can’t do it too significantly or you’ll misalign it with a C-clip and then you may have
some other problems there but if it’s off by millimeter or so, you might be able to rotate it enough to get the BBs to shoot straight.