Game-Based Learning | Part 7 of 10 – Simulation Card Games

Game-Based Learning | Part 7 of 10 – Simulation Card Games


David Chandross: Hello. Welcome back to Unplugged Gamification. We’re going to look at another kind of unplugged
game that you can start using in your classroom. It’s very effective for teaching and learning. The first one we’d show you was the Territory
Capture Map, which is useful for recalling information from prior lectures, and making
that more interesting than either writing a quiz or talking about the key facts as you
begin the lecture for the next session. This is a different kind of gaming. This is called Simulation Challenge Gaming,
and again, it’s done with a simple deck of cards, which you can produce yourself. What I’ve done here is I’ve produced some
cards which have different teaching methods on them, and I’m going to talk about how we
would use those. For example, this card is called Collaboration. This card here is called Build, and this card
would be a Dopamine Drip Card. Let’s look at how you’d use these tasks in
any kind of teaching in your classroom. These tasks can be anything you want your
students to be able to do at the end of their course. It could be mixing chemicals, it could be
producing baked goods, it could be responding to an emergency. Whatever task it is that you can function
having the student practice as part of the game. That’s what’s key. In this case, since I’m teaching you about
gamification, I’m going to be using some cards that have game themes on them. Let’s see how you play a simple game like
this. I’m going to take a deck of cards, this is
a simple deck. I’m going to draw a card from the back, either
working on my own or in a group. In a group is best with these, because you
get to collaborate with other learners, it stimulates people socially and helps people
learn from each other. I’m going to draw the card, and the card says
“Collaboration”. What I’m going to have to do, then, in the
next three minutes — and time is important, we’ll explain why — we’ve got three minutes
remaining in our challenge, and I’m going to start the timer now. I need you to come up with a technique in
your classroom that will have students collaborate to make the learning more effective. It has to be some kind of collaborative exercise. In any of these techniques, we’re again, finding
a target behavior or simulated behavior that we want the learner to practice. Here’s another card I’ve drawn. Now, the way you could work with this, you
could have a deck like this that you shuffle with all these projects, all these different
outcomes or simulations, and you can shuffle them, and then you can simply put the deck
on the desk, and you could have the students pick the card or you could have them turn
over the cards and then pick one of them from the deck, that they’d like to cover. There’s a couple variations on basically the
card driving some learning process, but some kind of selection process for the card. We’re going to pick another card, here. This card says “Combat”. Now I’ve got three minutes in which I have
to find some way, in my classroom, to introduce some thought of competition between students. Again, the timer makes everyone use their
hunches and work efficiently, and there’s some excitement because you have to race to
beat the clock, to go with, “What can I do in my classroom to make some competition?” You could, for example, if this was a course
in emergency care, have a case study in which you have to have people solve the case, to
see who can solve it the quickest. You could say, “Okay, we’re going to start
a timer now, and everybody, here’s the patient, here’s what’s wrong with him, you have to
find a way to save them,” and the first person to find the correct answer, to save them,
wins the game. Again, it’s making something more interesting. We drew the combat card, and now we’ve got
to do something involved with combat and competition. These are great little ways to pick up. Now, how do they turn into games? What’s very important in simulation games
is … We’re going to have one concept here called “Debriefing”. I think a lot of you are familiar with the
idea of debriefing. We have the simulation, so, for example, I’ve
made people, you in my classroom as learning about games, all come up with some way to
introduce competition in three minutes. After you’ve all done that, what we’re going
to do is take time to say, “Okay, Group A, what was your idea? Group B, what was your idea? Group C, what was your idea?” And so that we get an idea — this is called
the debriefing — a chance for students to share what their hunch and what their best
strategy would be to add competition in their classroom, and to see what other students
did. Then, that would be the game itself. In order to make it game-like and in order
to add competition, the thing you need to understand is we’ve already made it game-like. You don’t need to have winners or losers. The game was responding, very quickly, to
simulations, but it could be, in order to add a game, a couple of elements. Think about them. You could put in a timer, in 15 minutes, so
you’ve got to work through all these cards in your hand in 15 minutes, and when you do,
every time you do a card you get $1,000. You can tie that up to a reward. Every time they answer one of your challenges,
and they do it, they get $1,000. So to see how many $1,000 you could earn with
a maximum of how many cards in your hand per minute. I’ve got four cards in my hand, so in 15 minutes,
I could earn about $4,000. Now, there’s some vetting process, in which
the instructor has to look at it and say, “You know what? It wasn’t such a good idea. You just made up a bunch of random words,
so you’re cheating at the game.” You can disqualify those people. If you make up a bad answer, you’re immediately
disqualified. Then, you could have the students vote on
which the best solution was. If we had a whole bunch of you faculty coming
up with good ways to add competition to your classes, for learning, we could say, “Okay,
of the three minute challenge to come up with a good way to add competition, okay, everybody
vote. Who liked Group A’s idea? Who liked Group B’s idea?”, et cetera. You can do these kind of elements. This is the second great way we’ve taught
you that brings in simulation and task-focused gamification to your Unplugged Arsenal.