How to load the Game Boy Interface from a Memory Card on GameCube to play Game Boy on TV.

How to load the Game Boy Interface from a Memory Card on GameCube to play Game Boy on TV.


OK, today I’m going to show you the best and the simplest way to play Game Boy games on your TV using the Game Boy Interface. So I’m going to show you how to load the Game Boy Interface directly from a standard GameCube memory card just using a regular GameCube game without the need of modifying your console, burning DVDs or using special SD card loaders or adaptors. Firstly, if you don’t know what the Game Boy Interface is I’ll just give you a little bit of background history. So, back in 2003 Nintendo released a fantastic piece of hardware called the Game Boy Player which came in a variety of colours to match your GameCube plugging directly in to the bottom of the console to allow you to play the entire Game Boy & Game Boy Advance library on your TV. The only problem with this great bit of kit is that it requires you to run some software on the GameCube to make it work and the Game Boy Player software Nintendo provided gives a blurry picture with dull colours, and has more lag than your old 56K dial up modem. The solution for fixing this issue comes in the form of a superb bit of home-brew software called the Game Boy Interface. Written by a super clever guy called “Extrems”, this far superior software gives a super crisp image, vibrant colours with zero lag. It is customisable and even provides you with an option of playing in 240p which makes your Game Boy games look proper mint on an old school CRT TV. The usual way to load the Game Boy Interface like any home-brew software on the GameCube is by loading it off an SD card through an SD Card Adaptor but these official ones are quite hard to come by as they were only released in Japan. There are unofficial ones which come in various forms but these also aren’t too readily available. You could make your own which apparently isn’t too complicated with a bit of soldering, but who wants to do that? Then to use these you’ll either need to mod your console, load it via Swiss or some other media launcher. Now, don’t get me wrong, these SD card adaptors are great if you want to get into running homebrew on your GameCube, but if all you want to do is run the Game Boy Interface then they are not the simplest option when you can simply load it off a standard GameCube memory card. So this is what I’m going to show you how to set up today which will then allow you to use it with any GameCube making the Game Boy Interface as easy to load as the original official but inferior software. To get this set up you will first need a few items: Firstly a GameCube with a Game Boy Player Any old GameCube Memory Card, a copy of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker Any computer that can write to SD cards and a Soft Modded Wii with the GCMM home-brew software installed on the SD card. So the stumbling block here may be access to a soft modded Wii but you can pick an old Wii up for about a fiver and soft modding it is basically about as easy as tying your shoelaces these days. I’ll not go into details on soft modding a Wii here or how to install software on it as there are loads of tutorials on that out there that can probably explain it better than I can. The first thing to do is collect a few files off the internet. So mount your Wii’s SD card on your PC and visit Extrems’ website to download the Game Boy Interface Software. I’ve put a link to this in the description below. There are 3 versions of the software available. The main one is designed for LCD TVs and video capture and is customisable when loading via Swiss or even on the fly to allow you to adjust the size of the picture and stuff. The Low Latency version is designed for CRT TVs and speedrunners and the Ultra Low Latency version is just described as being targeted at enthusiasts and both of the low latency versions are set up to kick out that sweet 240p signal. Both Low Latency versions have now just been replaced with the SpeedRunner (SR) version The files that you are looking for within this method are located within the MCBACKUP folder. Just copy this whole folder to the root of your SD card and you can choose the version you want later when creating your memory card. The next thing you’ll need is a specially hacked game save for The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. You can grab a copy of this from github, with the link being in the description below. There are hacks for other games you can use, the Home Bros hack for Super Smash Bros is quite popular but what I like about the latest version of the Wind Waker hack is that you just need to press the start button and then boom you’re straight in playing your Game Boy game. So again download the zip file open it up and copy the 3 gci files within in it over to your MCBACKUP folder on your SD card. ou’ll only actually need to use one of these to match the region of your WindWaker game. If it is NTSC-US then you’ll want the gzle file, for Japanese you’ll want gzlj and for PAL in Europe you’ll want gzlp. If you’re still unsure and have really good eyesight, just check the code on inner ring on your disc and get the matching file. So now remove your SD card from your computer and plug it back into your Wii. Plug in your GameCube memory card into slot A on your Wii turn it on and open the GameCube Memory Manager software. You can use either the Wii controller or the GameCube controller to use it I’m using the GameCube controller so start by hitting [A] to use the Wii’s internal SD card. You can use an external USB drive if you wanted, but I’m just using the SD card here because it’s easier. Then click [X] for restore mode, then [A] for memory card slot A. Now you need to select the version of the Game Boy Interface you want to use. I’ll just select the normal version so just go down to gbi.gci and click [A]. This takes a little while to copy as it does take up 32 blocks on the memory card. Then click [A] again to go back. Now I need to put the Wind Waker hack on so click [X] again, then [A] again for memory card slot A. Now you need to choose the correct region of the hack to match your Wind Waker version. I want to use this on my pal system so I go down and highlight gzlp.gci file and press [A]. And that’s it, you’re all done. You can now turn your Wii off , forever… So now you can go back to your GameCube. Insert your favourite Game Boy game into your Game Boy Player, pop your memory card in to slot A Insert your copy of the Wind Waker and turn on the system. When the game loads up, just click start, it will then attempt to load the game save but will instead just jump you straight into your chosen Game Boy game through the wonderful Game Boy Interface software. As this was the normal version it does also give you the ability to play around and customise it a bit which you can do by clicking [X] and now you can adjust the screen size and move it around and stuff. Now to take this one step further you might want to look at the controller you are using. Now as much as I love the GameCube controller the small D-Pad is not the best and using the analogue stick for most Game Boy games feels a bit odd so what are your options? Well if you don’t like your money, you can try and track down one of these controllers made by Hori specifically for the Game Boy Player again these were only released in Japan in limited quantity so it will cost you a fair whack if you can find one. The cheaper alternative is to get what is arguably the best controller ever designed a standard super nintendo controller, and plug it in to one of these an SNES to GameCube adaptor from raphnet.net which will set you back about $30 Canadian dollars which is roughy about £18 and you’ll have much more natural feeling play style to suit most Game Boy games. So there you have it, now you can have the simplest and best possible solution for playing Game Boy and Game Boy Advance games on your TV. And obviously once you’ve got the Game Boy Interface on your memory card you can easily make copies for all your friends through the Memory Card section of the GameCube BIOS. If you’re interested to learn more about the Game Boy Interface and other home-brew software. I’d recommend heading over to the GC Forever forums. You’ll find the link below. As this is when I first due to other videos As this was one of my first tutorial videos, please let me know in the comments below if you found this useful or if you’d like to see any more guides for other similar things such as using Swiss or using other home-brew software and emulators on your GameCube and feel free to subscribe if you’d like to make sure you catch those. Just remember, when you’re done playing, don’t struggle trying to yank the cartridge out of the Game Boy Player, just press the eject button on the right hand side and it’ll pop straight out. 🙂