HOW TO PLAY SEVEN MEADOWS: A Tableau-Building Strategy Card Game

HOW TO PLAY SEVEN MEADOWS: A Tableau-Building Strategy Card Game


Hello, and welcome to how to play Seven
Meadows, a tableau building strategy card game. Presented by funreimagined.com In this video, we’ll begin by describing the game. We’ll show you what comes in the game box, as well as talk about the game objective, point system, game rules and game outcomes. By the end of the video, you should have a good understanding on how to play the game Game Description. Seven Meadows is a tableau building strategy card game. The game is for 3 to 5 players. The play time is approximately 10 to 15 minutes per game. The age requirement for this game is 12 years old and up. The game comes in a poker sized rigid box. Inside of the box, there are 52 beautiful and uniquely designed cards, 2 reference cards and 1 rule booklet. The objective of the game is to build the tableau while avoiding accumulating points. A tableau consists of four columns of cards, one color per column, in numerical order from 2 to 14. The player with the least points accumulated after all players have played their cards wins the game. Here’s what the tableau looks like. It has four color groups, blue, green, purple, and yellow. Each color has its own column, numbered 2 to 14. There are 52 cards in the deck for building the tableau. and each of the 52 cards has a point value associated with it. The cards with the face values from 2 to 10 are considered
low-point cards, and are worth 10 points each. The cards with face value from 11
to 14 are considered high-point cards and are worth 20, 30, 40, and 50 points
respectively. Game Rules. Before starting to play, players should first take out the rulebook and 2 reference cards and set them aside for reference later. Although each deck can play up to 5 players, we will use 3 players as an example here. Shuffle the remaining cards in the box thoroughly before
playing. To kick off the game, the dealer deals one card face down to each player in a clockwise direction, starting with the dealer until the full deck is distributed. Any player in the group can be the dealer and the dealer goes first. In this example, player one is the dealer. Once all players have received their cards, they should review their cards
individually and sort them to their liking. We recommend organizing the cards by color from the lowest number to the highest. Once everyone is finished organizing
their cards, the dealer starts the game by playing a 7, if one is available. In the deck, there are a total of four cards that have the face value of 7, one per color group. The four 7s are the starting points for each color column, and must be placed face up on the table first before adding other numbers
of the same color to build the tableau. The order of the color group doesn’t matter. For example, the purple group could be
next to green, yellow, or blue. Once the seven for a specific color group has been played, the players can start adding one sequential number per turned to build the tableau. In this example, the dealer has a purple 7 to play, so the dealer has to play the 7. If the dealer has no 7 to play, the dealer is required to discard a card. The dealer should store the discarded card privately without showing it to the group. Discarding cards accumulates points for the player who discarded them. At the end of each game, the player with
the least accumulated points wins. After the dealer plays the 7 in the
purple color group, the player who sits in a clockwise direction to the dealer
goes next. The player can either play a card in the same color group that is a
sequential number of the 7 played, or play a 7 from another color group. In this example, the player can either play a purple 8 or a purple 6. The cards should be placed either above or below the initial 7 accordingly, as noted in this video. Alternatively, the player can play a green 7. If the player chooses to
play a 7 from a new color group, the card should be placed face up and parallel to
the initial 7 played. In this example, the player has a few options for playing a
card. However, if the player doesn’t have any cards to play according to the game
rules, the player must discard a card, which adds to the player’s accumulated
points. All players should keep their discarded cards individually without showing them to the group until the game ends. Since the second player decided to
play a purple 8, now it’s the third players turn. Again, the player can either play a card that is a sequential number of any existing cards
played or play a 7 from a new color group. If the player doesn’t have any
cards to play according to the rules, discarding a card is required for the
turn. In this example, the player doesn’t have a sequential number of any existing
cards played, in other words, the player doesn’t have a purple 9 or a purple 6, so the player chooses to play a yellow 7 to start a new column of the tableau. Follow the same rules and let each player take turns to build the tableau. All players must either play or discard only one card during their turn. If a player has cards to play according to the rules, the player must play a card
instead of discarding a card. Continue to play until the game ends. The game ends when all players have played and/or discarded all their cards. As noted in the example, the tableau has been built. All players have either played or discarded their cards. The three separate piles are the discarded cards for tallying up the final points. Game Outcome First, we put away the tableau to free up some space for calculating the points. Now let’s take a look at what each player has discarded. The dealer has discarded three 3s; Player 2 has discarded a 14, a 13, a 12, a 4, and 3 2s; Player 3 has discarded a 3 and a 2. Each player should tally up their total individual points accumulated based on the point system. Remember, when tallying up points, only
face value matters, the color groups don’t affect the point system. The player with the least amount of accumulated points wins the game. The player with the
most amount of accumulated points loses the game. Every one in between is a draw.
For easier calculation, the players can compare cards and offset each other. For
example, the third player has 2 low-point cards which result in a total of 20 points accumulated. Since the other two players have more cards and points than the third player, we let each player
discard 2 low-point cards to offset each other. After discarding the cards,
the third player has no cards remaining which means the player accumulated the
least amount of points, thus, the third player won the game. The dealer has 10 points remaining and the second player has 140 points remaining. Since the second player has accumulated the most points at the end of the game, that player lost the game. That concludes how to play Seven Meadows. In addition to what we discussed in the video, we also included game strategies and instructions on how to play in teams in the rulebook which you will
receive as part of the purchase. Thank you for watching! Have fun playing!