Parents Explain Online Privacy | Parents Explain | Cut

Parents Explain Online Privacy | Parents Explain | Cut


– Odin, do you know that your
device has parental controls? – Uh, yeah. – Do you know how to turn them off? – Yes. – Yes?! – Yes. (classical music) – I’m Katie, Jack’s my son. – I’m Salaja, this is my mom. – [Interviewer] What devices do you have? – My phone, and the TV at home. – I have my Wii, my Gizmo, my Kindle, my iPad, and my phone. – I have a phone, my laptop. – I have a computer. – [Interviewer] How come she
has a cell phone and you don’t? – In middle school, unless
you have straight A’s, you don’t get a cell phone. – We’re gonna talk about online privacy. Do you know what that means? – No idea. (laughs)
– There you go! – [Interviewer] What’s online privacy? – Um, online privacy is… I don’t know how to explain it, except… If you’re just… – It’s protecting yourself from the, from the internet, and online people, things, I don’t know if I have a good explanation of online privacy. – There’s a lot of information out there that’s really exciting to do, but there’s also information
that’s being taken from you, when you use your phones,
and I need you to be sophisticated and savvy enough to know that you’re getting something and you’re giving something in return to get that information. – You know how I made you delete YouTube? And I don’t want you to
play games like Fortnite? – Yeah.
– Shouldn’t hear “yeah”. So the reason is, because there’s a lot of
things on the internet where you can communicate
with other people, we have no idea who those people are, that you’re talking to, right? And sometimes adults don’t
have good intentions, and they’re trying to get
information out of you. – People might wanna show
you inappropriate things, who might wanna teach
you inappropriate things. – Like what? Like what? – Things that your little
brain couldn’t even handle or imagine.
– Tell me now! Tell me now! – I’m trying to protect
you from these things. – Tell me now.
– I don’t wanna tell you. – I mean, maybe some hard core
porn (mumbles) to show you. I mean whatever you do in your
private time’s your business, but… – [Interviewer] Vanessa, do
you have any restrictions with your phone? – No, except that they track me. – And there is a provision
that if you erase anything, if your memory has strange gaps,
it’s gonna be an assumption that you’re maybe looking at stuff we don’t want you to look at, and there’ll be consequences for that. – Yeah. Do you trust us to be responsible? Like, not to do anything wrong? – No! – I think you guys should trust me, not to go through my phone, though. – Well, it’s not about
that we don’t trust you, it’s that we don’t trust
other people out there. – It’s not that I don’t trust you, it’s others. So I have to protect you, and I have to look through your phone in order to protect you. Or, okay, I could trust you, too– – Yeah.
– But I mean, it kinda keeps me hip, too,
if I look at a few things. – I trust you as much as I
should trust a thirteen-year-old. You’re supposed to make mistakes. But I wanna kinda be there, so that your mistakes aren’t major. – What social media apps do you have? – Snapchat, Instagram,
YouTube, and TikTok. I turned off everything being private. – You turned off everything being private? So, everything’s public? Why would you do that? – ‘Cause I can tell the
bad people from the good. – I want your accounts to
stay private, I want you to– – This one isn’t private. – I would like for you to
have your accounts private. – Yeah, I know, I mean I don’t care about turning it on private. – Well, then, why was it not on private? – ‘Cause I didn’t care to– (sighs) – I’m gonna check it in a
week, and make sure that that stayed on private. – [Interviewer] Does he have
any social media accounts? – Yes, but he doesn’t actually use them. – I have Twitter, and… I do! – You have Twitter?
– I’ll show you. – Odin, do you know that your
device has parental controls? – Uh, yeah. – Do you know how to turn them off? – Yes.
– Yes?! – Here’s Twitter. – How often do you do this
without my permission? – Often. – That’s me and Tiffany. – Are you guys in the bathroom? – Yes, we are.
– At school? – Yes, we are.
It was before class. – So, can anybody online see that? – Only the people that follow me. – But you said you have everything public. – Yeah, but not a lot
of people go to my page. – You don’t know that.
– I do know that. It gives you notifications. – I want your friends to
know that your creepy dad is on your social media, so
they’re gonna be more careful, because you guys are also responsible for what your friends say. – That’s great.
– Hmph. – Are you upset at me?
– No, well, I feel like– – You can be upset at me.
– I feel like a few of the things you’re saying,
it’s not realistic. Most of the people I know aren’t gonna change how they do things, just ’cause a parent is concerned about it. – What’s the worst thing
you have ever posted? – I don’t know!
I don’t post that much, I can’t think of anything
I’ve ever regretted. – Then, why do you have an account? – Just for, like, to see other people. – So you’re just nosy?
– (sigh) No! – [Interviewer] Ask your
daughter if she has a “finsta”. – Ask her if she has a what? – [Interviewer] A “finsta”. – Do you have a “finsta”?
– I do not. – What’s a…
– A “finsta,” it’s like a, like a fake Instagram kids
don’t want their parents to see, keeping it a little
more private from them. – Would you do that to me? You wouldn’t do that, you
would just talk to me, right? Oh! Oh!
(laughs) – Now, what would happen to
you guys if I found a “finsta”? – They have a wine closet, and
he has a key to that closet. And he will take all of the electronics, and he will put them in the
closet, and he will lock it up. – I am a horrible person. – Why can’t I post things to Instagram? – Because even in the
short time that you’ve had an Instagram account, there’ve been a couple of odd messages I’ve received from people that I don’t know.
– Like what? – Someone was like, “where are you?” Or something. That’s not a question I
want you to be answering. – What would you do, if
you were on your tablet, and a stranger messaged you?
– I’ll delete it. – What if they’re like,
“click here for $1 million”? – I would still delete it.
– Oh. – If someone said, “Come with me,” I’d say, “Shut the bleep up!” – Well, that’s good to know, I suppose. – Do you flirt with strangers online? – No. – Has anybody flirted with you online? – No. – Just a random person
that worked name and said, “hey, what’s your name?” – Like, online, no.
– Now, ooh! – No, I– (laughs) – Have you ever received
any, like, naked pictures? Do your friends send those pictures? – Hm-mm. I’ve heard people
at school send stuff, but my friends haven’t sent any. – What do you say to ’em when you find out that they sent that stuff? – I don’t say anything about
them, it’s not my business. It gets leaked, it gets
leaked. It’s your fault! – You should tell them that! That stuff can follow you,
employers look at that stuff, moms look at that stuff. (laughs) – If you had somebody
take an image of you, maybe in a little compromising situation, and it spread, what would you do? – Probably… I would… – Would you come to me? – Maybe? – Do you think I wouldn’t get it? ‘Cause I get you. – [Interviewer] Do you feel like you’re overprotective of him?
– Yes. I mean, and when you’re older,
there will be a time where I’m going to have to let
you kind of explore it all for yourself, and it does concern me. – Your dad and I always talk to you about looking out for yourself, because if we’re not
around to protect you, you need to have some sort
of sense of what’s going on. And online, there’s no guarantee. – I don’t care if you’re missing out, when you’re nineteen-year-olds
and in college, you can do whatever you want. But when you’re living in with us, we have expectations, to help you develop into
the best person you can be. – Okay, I agree with that.
Tommy? – Yeah.
– What do you think? – I don’t know.
I mean, you’d think you’d have a little
more trust in us, but– – I’ll be your parent now;
I’ll be your friend later. – Between school and activities,
it’s nearly impossible to keep track of all the
passwords for your kids’ accounts. But with Dashlane, however,
you can give yourself a break. Whether you’re at home,
work, or on the phone, the Dashlane app generates
unique, strong passwords for each of your accounts, and
changes them automatically. All at the click of a button. Plus, it saves time by
auto-filling credit cards and personal information on any site. You can securely share
passwords with anyone, including your kids. So go ahead, and give them
your Netflix password, ’cause Dashlane keeps you in control without ever revealing your password. Make your life easier by heading over to dashlane.com/cut to try it out for free
on your first device. And use code CUT for a
discount on Dashlane premium.